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A 1944 model 109?

HarryD

Overdrive!
A while back, I brought your attention to the Landy (S2 I think) that appeared in the final sequences of that classic film "Ice Cold In Alex". Obviously, there were no Land Rovers in North Africa in 1944.

Well today, I find another gem, a 109" in 1944 England in the film "633 Squadron", it's in the background, some 9 mins 45 secs in. It's a 1964 film, but even then, they were a wee bitty careless.
 
A while back, I brought your attention to the Landy (S2 I think) that appeared in the final sequences of that classic film "Ice Cold In Alex". Obviously, there were no Land Rovers in North Africa in 1944.

Well today, I find another gem, a 109" in 1944 England in the film "633 Squadron", it's in the background, some 9 mins 45 secs in. It's a 1964 film, but even then, they were a wee bitty careless.

can you no find a wee clip?
 
i was wondering, ive been watching some stuff on the net about old landys dunno if you saw my thread 1971 landy
 
actualy i thaught the the landy was launched in 1948 im most likly wrong i usualy am
Yup...48, you are right...I was just pointing out yet another "Blooper" from the film makers.
All too often they will leave "older looking" motors in shot, regardless of historical accuracy.
I dont have a clip as it was on Sky Plus. When I get the DVD, I'll put an image here.
 
Yup...48, you are right...I was just pointing out yet another "Blooper" from the film makers.
All too often they will leave "older looking" motors in shot, regardless of historical accuracy.
I dont have a clip as it was on Sky Plus. When I get the DVD, I'll put an image here.
Better late than never....the landy is middle distance. Ahead of the Jeep, blue with white roof.
Technical historical blooper for the film makers.
 

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There was also a SWB S1 that appears a couple of times in the same movie, once very obviously just after the mossie crashes in training & the observing officers run for the vehicle, which turns out to be said S1. Don't know why they bothered to run, obviously too late for that. :D
Steve.
 
Its a classic one that, theres a whole website about film makers mistakes,

Even very modern films were the makers have gone to great lenghts to get the correct gear still make classic mistakes like that
 
Dr who fans may have noticed a couple of weeks back in the one set in 1912, at the school for boys, they were having a vickers gun firing practice, and in the distance, you could clearly see a Tesco Lorry driving along a road.... :D

Sometimes the film makers just make mistakes simply because they are so use to seeing some vehicles, that when they put the film together, they just don't notice it.... that 109 was most likely on set all the time, and it just didn't register with anyone, or they had taken two takes of the same shot, one with it in, and one without it in, and the one without was completely wrong, and they could re-shoot it... all sorts of reasons...
 
Dr who fans may have noticed a couple of weeks back in the one set in 1912, at the school for boys, they were having a vickers gun firing practice, and in the distance, you could clearly see a Tesco Lorry driving along a road.... :D

Sometimes the film makers just make mistakes simply because they are so use to seeing some vehicles, that when they put the film together, they just don't notice it.... that 109 was most likely on set all the time, and it just didn't register with anyone, or they had taken two takes of the same shot, one with it in, and one without it in, and the one without was completely wrong, and they could re-shoot it... all sorts of reasons...

Mistakes happen but sometimes and you see it a lot, theres a period drama on, often wartime, they go to great lenghts getting the road to look right correct tax disc, uniform the lot. Then arrive at a station and along comes a British rail livery engine and coaches about 20 years out of date, even the steam engine post WW2, surely someone either the presevered railway or film maker should know, after all plenty of period train stock about.
 
Mistakes happen but sometimes and you see it a lot, theres a period drama on, often wartime, they go to great lenghts getting the road to look right correct tax disc, uniform the lot. Then arrive at a station and along comes a British rail livery engine and coaches about 20 years out of date, even the steam engine post WW2, surely someone either the presevered railway or film maker should know, after all plenty of period train stock about.

Railways are always a problem, as firstly they need a location which suits the story, i.e. the right buildings etc... once that is found, they then have to see what Loco's are available that that location that can be used, that also would be the right size of loco... most preserved railways are more likely to have newer local express type loco's available, simply as these often were the first to be kept running, as running a loco is expensive and a lot of these loco's are in private hands. They will often have the situation of having a perfect loco and the perfect location in two completely different places and to transport a loco isn't a cheap thing to do.. esp as a lot of the preserved ones can't run on the national rail network under their own power...

So, some things, you can forgive the film makers... as it just isn't practical. Other things though, it would be easy to sort out, like having the right type of car or tractor etc... as these can be easily transported, and you have a much larger number available that people have kept running....
 
Railways are always a problem, as firstly they need a location which suits the story, i.e. the right buildings etc... once that is found, they then have to see what Loco's are available that that location that can be used, that also would be the right size of loco... most preserved railways are more likely to have newer local express type loco's available, simply as these often were the first to be kept running, as running a loco is expensive and a lot of these loco's are in private hands. They will often have the situation of having a perfect loco and the perfect location in two completely different places and to transport a loco isn't a cheap thing to do.. esp as a lot of the preserved ones can't run on the national rail network under their own power...

So, some things, you can forgive the film makers... as it just isn't practical. Other things though, it would be easy to sort out, like having the right type of car or tractor etc... as these can be easily transported, and you have a much larger number available that people have kept running....

I take your point not easy, however you would think either not show a clip, often just a train pulling out or the station, or do what early film makers did and share the same clip

Thers again a whole website devoted to were the same clip appears in several different films
 
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