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How Do I? galvy cappings and the cleaning of said cappings.

nobber

Extreme Landy Fan
ive sanded it with 400 grade wet and dry , used one of those metal pan cleaning sponge thingys then rubbed it down with some wire wool.
is there an easier way?
 

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Nitromors to cheically clean it, in conjunction with plastic Scotch pads. I wouldn't recommend sand paper or wire wool as they may go through the galv to easily.
 
I just scraped the paint off mine (was very flakey as they had never been prepped properly. Snoother over with some very fine grit sand till it was touch smooth. Then painted with etching primer/zinc primer/top coat..

It has come off in some areas, but thats mostly where its been abused and has had stuff sliding all over it!
 
Nobber,

I've always been under the impression that you have a post '83 "Defender" type truck.

This door tells me a different story.

What truck have you got and what engine has it got?

Getting back to this lot. Your galv is probably in the region of between 25 and 30 years old. <ost hot dippers tell us that the lifespan is only 25 years. Your galv looks very good - if I may say so myself.

In a perfect world, I'd suggest you remove the cappings carefully and send then to be sandblasted and re galvanised.

But we live in the real world.

If you want to keep the "shiney effect", spray your galv with a lacquer sealer of some sort.

If you plan on painting over it. Wipe it down with Morden's T Wash (also known as galv cleaner). Wear gloves. The galv will go black. This is normal. Once it's dried, just spray it with acid etch primer and you should end up with something like this. That can then be painted.
 

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I just scraped the paint off mine (was very flakey as they had never been prepped properly. Snoother over with some very fine grit sand till it was touch smooth. Then painted with etching primer/zinc primer/top coat..

Next time, wipe it with T wash. This will give the paint a key to stick to.
 
Nobber,

I've always been under the impression that you have a post '83 "Defender" type truck.

This door tells me a different story.

What truck have you got and what engine has it got?

.

ive got a B reg (1985) 90 2.3L petrol (now changed for a 19j). it did have one piece doors but ive replaced them with series doors.
the galvanizing on the tub looks to be in really good shape and as im painting everytrhing i thought id try and clean up the galvanizing a bit as well.
 
Nobber,

I've owned and rebuilt more than one or two Land Rovers, but i'd like to say that you are much more brave than me.

Only once did I consider going from a petrol to a diesel. I got a 3.3l perkins with it's converstion plate, removed the 2.3 petrol and dropped it in.

That's when the fun began.

With hindsight I would have saved myself a lot of agro, time and money by getting hold of a shot ex MOD 2.5 petrol engine for maybe £20 on ebay, rebuilding it and dropping it into the engine bay. I've since driven one of those trucks and there's nothing wrong with that engine. Given, it's not a V8, but there's nothing wrong with it.

For your own long term sanity and safety, go to a breakers and get the correct bits to convert your petrol loom to a 2.5TD loom. That includes things like the proper ignition switch / steering lock and a whole lot of other bits and pieces that I can't remember off the top of my head.

This business of "make a plan" (for example glow plug relays) comes back to bite one in one's bum when one least expects it. At least in the wilds of Belsize Park, you can the AA or the RAC. Out here it's a very different story. There are very valid reasons why I won't even go off the beaten track in Africa with the TD5. On roads that are maybe travelled twice a month, an engine fire or other electrical breakdown could easily become a matter of life or death.

That's my sermon over. I look forward to seeing the finished doors. I like those series doors more than the one piece units and have a couple of sets of them up in my workshop loft waiting for the right trucks to mate them to.
 
I like the 2.5 petrol also. It`s one of the engines I`m considering on a future project. On paper the power curve looks good although I`ve only had a brief shot of one.

I do believe that diesel is more widely available for travelling the Continents though

Contrary to popular belief , wire wool is gentler than the Scotch type pads . A guy who did rechroming told me this and it was what he cleaned poor chrome with. For a reasonable look Nobber if you fiddle about with the many types of grey metalics or primers you should get a look to suffice. It may also keep your spiralling costs down.

Alex
 
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