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getting all the cr4p out of the chassis

wildbillcoyote

Accelerating Away
Hi

any body got any good suggestions on how to remove all the mud and crap that has managed to get in to the chassis.

is it just a case of getting the jet washer right inside then waxoyling?

some of the sections are almost full and I am concerned this will bring on the dreaded rot a bit quicker than I would like

cheers

steve
 
It will rot..no question.

When I bought my 97 defender it was full of mud. A year later its dead...gone..rusted away :(

I spent around 8 hours flushing the chassis...it was a nightmare.

Basically I got a coat hanger, a hose and a pair or rubber gloves. I poked the hose into every hole I could find and used the wire from the coathanger to poke around in nearby holes to remove and losen any mud, stones and crap that was there. You will be amazed at how huch comes out!. Much of it was up inside the chassis rails, not on the bottom where you might expect..so the wire came in handy. Give it a good soaking forst, leave a few hours then get going with the hose and wire.

I did each section in turn, and then drove it about a bit to make sure all the water had sloshed out.

Dont forget up inside the outriggers!!!

Its a pain to do...but well worth it..pity the previous owner had not bothered on mine!!! It had just passed its MOT when I bought it and looked fine but withing 6 months holes started to appear from the inside! :(
 
cheers guys

any thoughts on waxoyling - I read somewhere about mixing NEW engine oil with the waxoyl for the insides - I reckon anything will be a help.

also what are your thoughts on the outside of the chassis - paint or waxoyl? - there seem to be differing opinions, the main chasis is basically sound at the mo so anything to prolong the life will be a bonus.

cheers

Steve
 
I seem to remember AJ had a good one, it involved the vaccum cleaner and Dorris NOT being home when you do it :D


Cheers
 
I seem to remember AJ had a good one, it involved the vaccum cleaner and Dorris NOT being home when you do it :D


Cheers
True, but it was hoovering the crud out of the chassis without Mrs AJ knowing I was using the hoover.

Thanks for that Toppa. :D

AJ
 
I tried the old stiff wire & loads of water trick on my Discovery years ago. I thought it was succesful, until the flippin' thing rotted into a big hole :( . On cutting out the rusty section I found a big "Tide mark" on the swan neck section between the rear axle and bumper. Everything above the line was nice and waxoyled, but below the line was a lump of congealed silt and rust flakes :eek: .

If I was ever to do the job again, I would seriously consider, cutting a couple of large holes [75mm X 75mm :rolleyes: ] in the bottom of the chassis and making sure that every last piece of muck was removed before applying any form of treatment. Obviously plating over the holes afterwards would be another job to do, but no reason not to do the job properly
 
hi sandy thanks for that - interesting as this is where i reckon most of the crap has built up in mine.

I reckon the drilling hole option would be a good one, I might even put some rubber bungs in so as i could do the process more regularly

cheers
steve
 
True, but it was hoovering the crud out of the chassis without Mrs AJ knowing I was using the hoover.

Thanks for that Toppa. :D

AJ
Should hav elaborated last last night. The hoover extension tube had a length of garden hose pipe taped to the end which gave flexibility to get right into the chassis. All crud inside the chassis was totally dry and loosened up with a wire coat hanger first. Worked a treat. ;)

AJ
 
youve given me an idea - i reckon i could do the same with my garden blower vac and a bit of gaffa and a hose. might not be quite as manouverable as a hoover but at least i wont get in the sh1t with the missus

that would suck the insides out of a horse ;)

will give it a go and let you know of progress
 
Does anyone know if the chassis is "hollow" right through? What I mean is, if I take the bumper off could I pass a pressure hose all the way through? Or is there a way through from the back ? You can get those drain cleaning attachments that would really blast the crap out.
 
Does anyone know if the chassis is "hollow" right through? What I mean is, if I take the bumper off could I pass a pressure hose all the way through? Or is there a way through from the back ? You can get those drain cleaning attachments that would really blast the crap out.

Unfortunately not :( . I looked into that plan when I was doing my Discovery, however the chassis is formed from two opposing channels which are welded together [ obviously :rolleyes: ], and at various locations there are plates welded across the gap, presumably to make sure that the two halves go together at the correct distance, and perhaps to spread the load a bit at crossmembers, outriggers etc etc. There are also tubes welded through the chassis at locations such as gearbox mounts, steering box mounts.
 
If I was ever to do the job again, I would seriously consider, cutting a couple of large holes [75mm X 75mm :rolleyes: ] in the bottom of the chassis and making sure that every last piece of muck was removed before applying any form of treatment. Obviously plating over the holes afterwards would be another job to do, but no reason not to do the job properly

I'm going to clean and waxoyl mine sometime soon, so was watching this thread and hoping for more info or opinions...

Would it be Ok to cut holes in the chassis sections..? wont this weaken it?

It seems to me like a good solution to getting the cr*p out (and the waxoyl in), but I dont want to do anything thats gonna cause me grief later on...

I was thinking of cutting a 50mm hole (would seem large enough..?) at any 'low' point in the chassis where water might settle, and would use a grommet to stop up the holes again afterwards (to allow for re-proofing or draining water out at any time).

I would have thought that if having holes in the chassis would assist in clearing the interior of water and sh*t without causing any problems, then LR would have made them that way..?

Has anyone actually done this..?

MikeA
 
...Would it be Ok to cut holes in the chassis sections..? wont this weaken it?

I would cut the holes to assist in clearing the muck out the chassis - however I would also ensure that as soon as the muck was out, the holes were properly plated over again. Provided the plating is properly done, the strength of the chassis should not be affected, unlike the scenario where unseen corrosion merrily eats its way from the inside out.

I would have thought that if having holes in the chassis would assist in clearing the interior of water and sh*t without causing any problems, then LR would have made them that way..?

If LR were so keen to keep the chassis clean they would not have fitted a 4WD system :D :D
 
I would cut the holes to assist in clearing the muck out the chassis - however I would also ensure that as soon as the muck was out, the holes were properly plated over again.

Appreciate thats probably the best answer mechanically, but Ive had experience of welding the chassis on my old sherpa van when it was waxoyled, and its not to be recommended...

I suppose the answer is to cut the holes, get the cr*p out, plate up the holes again, and THEN waxoyl...

Was more work than I was hoping for, and assumes that I wont have to do it again...

Gona hav to give this more thought...
 
Appreciate thats probably the best answer mechanically, but Ive had experience of welding the chassis on my old sherpa van when it was waxoyled, and its not to be recommended...

I suppose the answer is to cut the holes, get the cr*p out, plate up the holes again, and THEN waxoyl..

Yes, trying to weld upside down while hot waxoyl is running down yer sleeve, and igniting inside the box section is NOT recommended :eek:


Was more work than I was hoping for, and assumes that I wont have to do it again.....

Gotta balance the options of spending a little time now, cutting, cleaning, welding and the protecting the "good" chassis, - or leave it 'till it becomes corroded and weak and then start applying all those little patchwork plates in awkward places.

I would recommend that if you have the time and facilities to do a proper clean and protection job now, then do it, and enjoy the next few years with a solid chassis.
 
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