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Insulate/line the back of a 90

mikeb

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Has only one tried to insulate or line the back of their defender? I'd like to do mine but am struggling to find the right stuff to do it with.

Any suggestions would be appreciated

Mike
 
Insulate, use Celotex or Kingspan urethane insulation & Carpet or plywood over or just carpet or plywood if you want to line it out depending what you want to do in the back of it. ;)
 
I useed camp mats, then planning on putting ply over that then carpet on the ply, have done the cab and has made a big difference...


Cheers
 
I used plain old rock wool loft insulation which was left from building my house, it works well, quietens things down and makes it warm up much quicker in cold weather. I have lined the sides (90 van) with 10mm marine plywood which I covered with grey vinyl to match the front door panels and cubby box. This coupled with a Lasalle headlining makes things a bit more comfortable.
 
Thanks for all the suggestions. For those of you who have ply lined the back how did you attach it to the sides? I was thinking of attaching a small batten to the rail that runs horizontally along the back and also one to the top where the roof meets the side.

If anyone has a better way let me know.

Cheers
 
For those of you who have ply lined the back how did you attach it to the sides? I was thinking of attaching a small batten to the rail that runs horizontally along the back and also one to the top where the roof meets the side.

Cheers

You've got the jist of it.

I filled the gap with expanding foam to insulate against heat and noise.

Lasalle headliners are worth the money. I also put expanding foam between te headliner and the roof.

Be very weary of normal carpet. It starts stinking after the first rains. Rather use marine carpet.
 
One suggestion: use 3mm aluminium chequerplate rather than plywood.

There isn't much difference in price between a sheet of chequerplate and a sheet of marine ply.
 
Felt is available from Noisekiller (whose website seems to have moved tonight) or http://www.woolies-trim.co.uk perhaps, or http://www.automobiletrim.com/sound-proofing.html

Ply is much nicer than metal unless you intend to move a lot of machiery that would chew it up. It is quieter, and insulates and is more friendly than metal. Mine 9mm was already fitted using self tapping screws through large washers into the vertical frames of the rear.
The floor sheet is just laid down with a couple of screw through the floor at the front so that nothing obstructs or catches things being slid in along it. The wheelbox side sheets hold down the edges of the floor sheet and are just held by 3 screws into the panel but it would be better to align carefully with the framing. Then the wheelbox tops ditto. They overlap the side sheets.
 
You can get flange head self tappers that don't really need washers. Look really neat and they come in stainless too.
Screwfix or wherever.
 
I have nearly finished my 110 and I used :-

a) Double layer of Wickes aluminiumised flashing tape (I seem to remember it is called "Technical Flashing Tape") - gently warmed with a hot air gun to get the bitumen layer stuck down. This reduced the drumming from the panels.
b) Single layer of 9mm camping mat (the army style ones are about £4 a mat) which will not absorb water.
c) Horse trailer matting (the thinner stuff 3mm intended for the side walls of horse trailers) - about £20 for a 6'x4' sheet

Of course then another part of the 110 appears to be noisy and so that needs some insulation too ...
 
When I had my Toyota Surf I made a boot liner from some 11mm x 6ft x 4ft rubber stable matting...£20 from ebay and damn heavy duty. Might be worth a thought.

Some pics of what I did HERE
 
Are these what we know as TEC screws?


TEC screws are self starting. In that they have a drill bit end, this first drills the hole the threads on the screw cut into the metal.


As for lining out we use 4mm ply, if a more rigid structure is needed then we glue 1mm ali to the ply. Insulated with Rockwool

The Ali we use is called Stuco (sp), it is about .8mm and has a textured finsh.

This will be method I will be using once I have fitted the new chassis
 
TEC screws are self starting. In that they have a drill bit end, this first drills the hole the threads on the screw cut into the metal.

TEC screws are great. I've just roofed my new 36 square meter car port using them.

It amazes me is that you can take two guys, two drills, a couple of lengths of square tubing, a couple of lengths of lip channel, some IBR roof sheeting, LOTS of TEC screws and have a completed car port within five hours.

The Ali we use is called Stuco (sp), it is about .8mm and has a textured finsh.

I love that product. It gives a much nicer finish than five bar treadplate. Unfortunately we can't get it any thicker than .8mm out here and I don't think that's quite up to the rigours of Africa, but I will be using it decoratively on some parts of my trailer on top of 3mm smooth aluminium plate.
 
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