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Jessac ‘64 Series 2A Brake pipe set

Bessie

In Fourth Gear
What’s the current thinking on new brake pipes? Copper (Kunifer?), stainless steel, flexi hoses, male / female ends? Any advice / tips?
This probably won’t be the last question, so brace yourselves!
 
Kunifer, not copper. Copper is too malleable and stress hardens.

Pipework and fittings should be unf, but who knows, decide what you want to use and stick with it. Brass pipe fittings are okay, but softer than steel. I use steel myself.

You'll find wheel cylinders are sold as UNF, but Flexi hoses are available in either metric or unf. So check the parts numbers. New flexis don't come with nuts, but you can cut a female brake pipe nut to fit.

My advice would be to get the 2/2a parts book, and the optional parts book, Brooklands books do both. The S3 parts book will get many parts, but some are 2/2a specific so may as well have the right book to start off with.
 
As others have said yes - Kunifer. Be wary of the supplier though as crappy Chinese "Kunifer" tubing exists and it's... crappy. I don't know what the pre-meausured kits are like but after doing my own I'd be inclined to suggest that route. Yes you can buy a good quality double-flare tool and yes you can source decent tubing and fittings but from personal experience I can say that that route is fairly expensive. Of course ending up with the tools and experience is worth something if you're only going to do it once then pre-made parts might be a better bet. Be wary of Britpart... 🙄
 
I use Copper. Never had an issue in 25 years. Maybe 26 years is the time to worry :p
I find it much easier to work with, but you can't be lazy: support the line correctly along long runs and at every corner.
I use steel fittings, small dab of copper slip on thr threads (and just the threads) and once assembled, slather them in some old grease to keep them fresh.
I have goodridge stainless braided flexies. You don't need to be so fancy, but they will last a long time. Probably that 26 years the Copper lines last ;)
Buy the best quality stuff for brakes. The rest isn't worth even the half price it is.
 
Firstly, a lot of places (and people) call Kunifer 'copper', so there is already some confusion!

It doesnt seem to be specifically illegal to use it either in the UK Construction and Use regs or the MOT guidelines, but may be considered as unsafe depending on the inspector.

In Australia, copper brake pipes are specifically banned
(Brake components and brake lines must be mounted in areas where they are not likely to be struck by objects thrown up from the road. They also must be protected from excessive heat and abrasion. The use of copper tubing for hydraulic brake pipes is not allowed. Joining hydraulic brake pipes by brazing, silver soldering, etc is not allowed.)

They can and do fail;
 
Firstly, a lot of places (and people) call Kunifer 'copper', so there is already some confusion!

It doesnt seem to be specifically illegal to use it either in the UK Construction and Use regs or the MOT guidelines, but may be considered as unsafe depending on the inspector.

In Australia, copper brake pipes are specifically banned
(Brake components and brake lines must be mounted in areas where they are not likely to be struck by objects thrown up from the road. They also must be protected from excessive heat and abrasion. The use of copper tubing for hydraulic brake pipes is not allowed. Joining hydraulic brake pipes by brazing, silver soldering, etc is not allowed.)

They can and do fail;
I don't think raw copper tubing is allowed in North America. I wouldn't use it myself anyway as I wouldn't trust it like I would steel. With some experience in industrial hydraulics I can say I'm not a fan of brass fittings either, at least when it comes to 1000psi and up. Same goes for NPT or "tapered thread" fittings. In my opinion brake systems should be of all-steel construction.
I hope that doesn't come off as preachy, I don't want to be "That safety guy". I'm a firm believer that even poorly constructed vehicles are less of a threat to society than the multitude of bad drivers and drunkards that roam the streets.
 
I don't think raw copper tubing is allowed in North America. I wouldn't use it myself anyway as I wouldn't trust it like I would steel. With some experience in industrial hydraulics I can say I'm not a fan of brass fittings either, at least when it comes to 1000psi and up. Same goes for NPT or "tapered thread" fittings. In my opinion brake systems should be of all-steel construction.
I hope that doesn't come off as preachy, I don't want to be "That safety guy". I'm a firm believer that even poorly constructed vehicles are less of a threat to society than the multitude of bad drivers and drunkards that roam the streets.
I have used copper brake pipe for years .. with out any problems .. but twice i have had a steel brake pipe burst .. through corrosion .. once on an mot test .. and once approaching a road junction ... that was interesting shall i say ..
 
Same here, on my van the originals corroded badly where i had haphazardly covered them in underseal so probably my fault and that they were 20 years old,
With my limited experience of a land rover series 2a 88 i would not now try to fix or upgrade anything that isnt broken until i have a good bit of spare time and all the parts bought in readiness as one thing invariably leads to another,
ie,
if i was thinking to fit new lines it would be daft of me not to put 11inch tls hubs and a servo on if not already fitted whilst i am down there,
my next job after sorting the wiring on my 109 is a servo so that will mean new lines seals etc and so it goes on.
Not unenjoyable work but its time spent not driving it and the sun is shining,
 
All my dangerous brake failures have been due to steel lines corroding.
You might say the MOT man should have seen it, or I should have checked...but how do you check the wall thickness of a tiny pipe?
If I replaced every steel line that looked bad, i'd have rebuilt my brakes every 2-3 years...
As a fellow 'that safety guy' I understand the need to be assured of your brake safety, but I could not go for steel ever again.
 
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