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Seized caliper bolt

Snagger

Posting Guru
Does anyone have any suggestions on how to remove a siezed caliper bolt with a rounded head, please? (Top bolt on rhs.)
 
With difficulty.

As Colin says or a mini grinder to remove the head.

How I detest those bolt heads, yest I can't find anything to replace them with.
 
have you tried hammering a smaller 12sided socket on it? 1/2" or even 12mm. if it's a bit rounded try battering the head first, this will do 2 things, it will shock it and also mushroom the head thus tightening the sockets grip.

good luck paul
 
Has anyone used one of those Gatorgrip things that you see advertised? The ones with lots of pins that mould to the shape of the bolt, whether it's damaged or not?
 
The problem that Snagger has is that the head of the caliper retaining bolt is difficult to access. There's no space to weld or get a grinder in without damaging the caliper housing.

Nick, what about removing the lower bolt, and then wiggling the caliper housing about to loosen the other bolt in it's thread.

Then drill a hole in the head and use one of those reverse thread removers (we call them Eezi-Out's), but I'm sure there's a proper technical term. They're hardened steel tapered rods with a coarse reverse thread cut into then. You screw them anti-clockwise into the hole you've drilled, and they tighten up.

Marc
 
The problem that Snagger has is that the head of the caliper retaining bolt is difficult to access. There's no space to weld or get a grinder in without damaging the caliper housing.

Nick, what about removing the lower bolt, and then wiggling the caliper housing about to loosen the other bolt in it's thread.

Then drill a hole in the head and use one of those reverse thread removers (we call them Eezi-Out's), but I'm sure there's a proper technical term. They're hardened steel tapered rods with a coarse reverse thread cut into then. You screw them anti-clockwise into the hole you've drilled, and they tighten up.

Marc

If you can get at the head to drill it, can you drilla hole the same diameter as the shank until the head is off, then remove caliper from the other side and remove the shank with grippers/stilsons or whatever?

Will a dremel od similar small grinder be any use , either cutting the head off, or making 2 flats on it to get aspanner on?
 
Thanks for all the suggestions. Marc, you're right about the difficulty of access!

I used Muddybungy's Irwin set, identical to the extractors posted by Reedx. The first one that I hammered on rounded the head even more when I applied about 200ftlb to the breaker bar. I then used the 13mm socket (which took a fair bit of club hammering to get on). There's not much left of the bolt head, but it did reluctantly come out. Those extractors are expensive, but if you do a lot of this sort of work, they're well worth the money!
 
Thanks for all the suggestions. Marc, you're right about the difficulty of access!

I used Muddybungy's Irwin set, identical to the extractors posted by Reedx. The first one that I hammered on rounded the head even more when I applied about 200ftlb to the breaker bar. I then used the 13mm socket (which took a fair bit of club hammering to get on). There's not much left of the bolt head, but it did reluctantly come out. Those extractors are expensive, but if you do a lot of this sort of work, they're well worth the money!

Pleased to see you've won.

If you thought that the front was tight....:D Don't look at the Defender rear.:eek: :eek:
 
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