• Welcome to the Land Rover UK Forums

    You are currently viewing the site as a guest and some content may not be available to you.

    Registration is quick and easy and will give you full access to the site and allow you to ask questions or make comments and join in on the conversation. If you would like to register then please Register Now

stainless flexi brake pipes - can you clamp 'em

jasper110

Offroader
i get the feeling that you can't, and, as as i want to replace the brake calipers,am i going to have to drain all the brake fluid off?? are there any tricks of the trade?

many thanks.
 
I'm far from certain, but I'd be suprised if you cant clamp them - the rubber tube inside will be similar to the standard hose. The stainless braiding and plastic outer sheath should flex without any damage.
 
i get the feeling that you can't, and, as as i want to replace the brake calipers,am i going to have to drain all the brake fluid off?? are there any tricks of the trade?

many thanks.

If you use proper pipe clamps you'll be ok Don't use long nose molegrips or anything similar as you'll crush the steel braiding and this could then damage the inner rubber brakeline.
 
Do not clamp them as above. The best way is some thing like a money bag (small plastic one) and a rubber band. Works for me every time.

Paul
 
If you decide not to clamp them. put some plastic bag over the top of the master cylinder then screw the top on to that so as to create a vacuum - you won't loose nearly as much fluid this way.
 
Nope. Not doable. :eek:
You will damage the SS covering.

That's why I use OE ones.
Just pulled this of A google classic car forum. The gut who posted it runs an hydraulic hose business. I think he knows what he's on about.

"The inner tubing in the brake hose is specifically selected to be soft, malleable, highly elastic/plastic, one might even say excessively flexible, but most importantly chemically stable when exposed to the hydraulic fluid on the inside and air on the outside (unlike rubber!). It is definitely not, repeat not, selected to withstand the pressure of the brake fluid when the brakes are operated. That pressure withstand capability is provided by the braided (read flexible) steel (read strong) outer sheath. In fact, the very same principle that is used in OEM reinforced rubber brake hoses, except they have integral instead of external reinforcement.

When the outer sheath becomes damaged, it will cause very little perceptible damage to the soft inner core (due to the core's material strength properties as outlined above), unless significant tearing takes place allowing large and repeated relative movement. Even then, since the individual strands of steel wire that form the braid are so thin (read weak), it would be highly unlikely to penetrate sufficiently to give rise to significant surface damage to the inner core tubing. It is true that the
inner core may burst, but that is because the load bearing component of the brake hose (ie the braided steel outer sheath) has been compromised and can no longer resist the internal pressure of the brake fluid when the brakes are operated."

As I said earlier as long as you don't use anything with a sharp edge to clamp them you'll be fine. (Another urban myth nipped in bud.);) :D
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Or, when you remove the fitting from the caliper, get somone to gently apply the brake and bolck the pedal so it can't return.
Obviously you'll lose a squirt of fluid, but you'll be bleeding afterwards anyway.
The pistons in the m.cyl. will stop excess fluid from draining out of the hose while you change the caliper.
Or just don't be cheap........let all the fluid out, and put fresh stuff in! You're supposed to change the stuff periodically anyway.
Whenever I do brakes I let the fluid fall out, and then bleed them thoroughly until fresh fluid arrives at the bleed nipples.

swag
 
Back
Top Bottom