• Welcome to the Land Rover UK Forums

    You are currently viewing the site as a guest and some content may not be available to you.

    Registration is quick and easy and will give you full access to the site and allow you to ask questions or make comments and join in on the conversation. If you would like to register then please Register Now

Universal Joints now replaced.

Wild Rover

Overdrive!
With the help of this forum I recently found the source of an annoying / worrying metalic noise. A very little movement was discovered in the rear prop shaft uj at the differential, it was less than 1mm. So armed with a couple of spanners and two replacement uj's I removed the prop shaft only to discover that one of the bearing cups was actually empty. I was not expecting this, thinking that such a small movement in the uj would be the result of wear. So, I can safely say I have found the problem. The retaining circlips were a pain to dislodge as they appear to have corroded into their seats but a considered whack with a drift on the bearing cap and another on the circlip itself helped.

A word of warning at this point on circlip pliers. Don't be tempted into buying cheap pliers, I did and the first pair collapsed on the first clip. By this time my prop shaft was in the kitchen so no transport. The only source of new pliers within walking distance produced another set of 5 cheap pliers, two of which broke.

The old bearings were drifted out by placing the yolk on top of a socket and tapping from the top. The disintegrated bearing can be seen in the picture next to a new one. I did not have a vice so had to use my Land Rover special tool No. 6 to press the new bearing cups into place. The first one was easy, the second not so. There was some resistance to get it in its final position which I thought was the result of the bearing not being straight. Trying to slide the spider to its full extent into each bearing proved impossible on one side so to make sure I dissmantled the uj to check. One of the needle rollers had dropped into the centre of the bearing. More care next time and stop at any resistance. So the G clamp worked well and only cost £6 for a pair. The job completed with all the pieces put back together in the right allignment with grease nipples in the right place and put back on the 110.

The amazing thing is that little bearing cup appears to be the cause of practically all the clunk in the drive train. As the test drive resulted in smooth take up on acceleration and deceleration alike. Gear changes are great. Never thought this would happen.
 

Attachments

  • Library - 2259.jpg
    Library - 2259.jpg
    22.5 KB · Views: 72
  • Library - 2260.jpg
    Library - 2260.jpg
    14.7 KB · Views: 82
  • Library - 2263.jpg
    Library - 2263.jpg
    40.4 KB · Views: 76
  • Library - 2264.jpg
    Library - 2264.jpg
    40.2 KB · Views: 58
  • Library - 2266.jpg
    Library - 2266.jpg
    35.5 KB · Views: 67
:) Nice one, it's not a difficult job but the difference it makes is amazing isn't it? :D

Oh yeah, and I'm with you all the way on the circlip pliers - I got a pair of those combined internal / external ones - total disaster! Should have stuck to my usual rule of 'one tool for one job' ... false economy
 
It's amazing the difference that new UJs make, isn't it? You were lucky with the dropped needle - someone replaced my UJs for me (one of the engineers at a flying school) and he cracked the bottom off the bearing cup having dropped a roller.
 
You were lucky with the dropped needle - someone replaced my UJs for me (one of the engineers at a flying school) and he cracked the bottom off the bearing cup having dropped a roller.

Yes, I don't like hitting a thing to hard if I have not done the job before. I have not got my brute force / experience ratio up to full speed with Land Rovers yet. I was happy to knock 7 bells out of the Saab I had previously, one would think a Land Rover could take it but I can't bring myself to hit it properly yet.
 
I like to think I became an expert at replacing UJs, and if I was ever asked I could do them blindfolded.....;)

Back in the 90s I had an 84 RR which would knock out UJs every other month and allways a different one....:confused:
Never did work out why.

And you don't want to leave them too long before you change them as I did many years back with a Vauxhall Victor. I'd just pulled away from some lights and went to go for top gear when the front joint broke. That knocked the dust out the carpet...:eek:
 
I think anyone who has had landys will end up doing this job

I always grease mind ever time I go serious off road, trick is to get the grease to enter all 4 cups

has anyone ever used marine type grease?
 
I think anyone who has had landys will end up doing this job

I always grease mind ever time I go serious off road, trick is to get the grease to enter all 4 cups

has anyone ever used marine type grease?

I was wondering about that, when I was pumping the grease in it seemed to come out of two cups only. I gave it about ten pumps before giving up. Is there a trick to getting all cups full?
 
As long as you have eased the bearing cups back out against their circlips with the hammer, so that the cups aren't pushed in too tight against the spider, then the grease will enter each cup - it'll just emerge from the weakes seal first.
 
As long as you have eased the bearing cups back out against their circlips with the hammer, so that the cups aren't pushed in too tight against the spider, then the grease will enter each cup - it'll just emerge from the weakes seal first.

When you say eased out what do you mean. The only way I can see is to tap the opposite cup but in doing that you can end up in a repeating circle, tap on side oh, tap the other side oh, tap the other side oh, and so on if you see where I'm coming from. As far as I can see they are all against their circlips. Will try and grease them again after second test run.

Cheers
 
To ease the cups out against the circlips, using a vice, support the end flange yolk eyes on the vice jaws and using a soft faced hammer hit the shaft downwards by the yolk. Turn for the next and repeat etc.
 
Yes, with the prop fitted and all clips in place, give each yolk flange or "cup holder" a sharp tap with a hammer on the side to make the spider push the adjacent cup all the way out against its clip, for example:

When doing this before fitting the prop (easiest way), lay the prop horizontal, with one spider axis vertical, the other horizontal. To seat the cup closest to the floor, sharply tap downwards on the cup holders of the spider's horzontal axis. Rotate the prop 90 degrees and repeat, then rotate and repeat twice more so that each cup holder has been tapped "down".
 
Back
Top Bottom