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Valve Guides

Borderterrier

Offroader
Is there a top tip for fitting the exhaust valve guides to a S3 diesel head. Inlet valve guides were tight, but the exhaust ones are impossible, only going so far in and then stcking tight. Would freezing the valve guides help, with a little heat to the cylinder head do the trick? Also where can I but rocker arms from, can't see them anywhere? Thanks all.:)
 
I managed to get a new exhaust valve guide into my 2.25 diesel head without too much fuss,I found a bolt and washer that fit snugly into the valve hole to protect the guide,then tapped it in with Land Rover tool #1.
I didn't need to heat or freeze anything,but I don't suppose it'd do any harm if you stuck the guide in the freezer for a bit first.:)
 
Is there a top tip for fitting the exhaust valve guides to a S3 diesel head. Inlet valve guides were tight, but the exhaust ones are impossible, only going so far in and then stcking tight. Would freezing the valve guides help, with a little heat to the cylinder head do the trick? Also where can I but rocker arms from, can't see them anywhere? Thanks all.:)


Hi Bt
They were available from Paddocks, but are very expensive..
If you are only fitting new rockers because they are worn on the "pads". Get some valve stem covers for a 300tdi, they are only a few pence each from the above.
Drop them over the end of the valves, they are a perfect fit. They provide a wider footprint, bridging the wear and sitting on the hardening again.
Cya
mungo:)
 
Cheer fellas, Mick you couldn't send me a link to the page on Paddocks where they are listed could ya, I am being a biffa and can't find them!!
 
The pads on my rocker arms are badly worn and make adjustment almost impossible, as the valve tip has worn a 'hole' in the pad which makes using a feeler guage very interesting!!
 
I can't find them on the web site, as TEMPL4R said they are called valve caps.
Give them a ring and explain what you want, they will probably insist they don't fit, that's what they did to me.
They even got a cap and a series valve to prove to me they don't....Then he went, Ooh it does, I'll remember that, but he has probably forgotten by now:D
If you have trouble let me know.
Cya
Mungo:D
 
The pads on my rocker arms are badly worn and make adjustment almost impossible, as the valve tip has worn a 'hole' in the pad which makes using a feeler guage very interesting!!
That is why you use a Dial gauge instead of feeler Gauges.

We used to reface the tips of the rockers, if they didn't have replaceable pads.

The valve caps fit over the top of the valve stem. Just make sure they don't touch the collets.

Chris
 
I thought that a dial guage was used to ensure the correct position of the rocker arm prior to checking it with a feeler guage.:confused: How do you check the clearance between roker arm and valve cap with a dial guage??
 

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Yes, then if you wanted a 10 thou gap, you turn the adjuster until the dial moves 10 thou. That way, it doesn't matter if the rocker pad is worn. You are measuring the actual gap.

They are good for measuring brake disc run out, crank end float, etc.

Worth getting and so cheap now.

Chris
 
To be as accurate as possible, try to get the point exactly over the valve.

It's a far better way to set Tappets.

I would advise anyone to get a Dial Gauge if you do your own rebuilds. No Engineer works without one.

Chris
 
Thanks for the help/advice. Ant thoughts on the fitting of the exhaust valves or is the fact that they are B***part and contributing fact that means they will not seat properly?
 
Reading the thread, if you freeze them and they fit, you might then find the valves won't go through as the inner could be smaller.

Are the old guides worn very badly? Have you got a Micrometer to check the old against the new? It will be a surprisingly tiny amount that they are oversize, to make them a tight interference fit.

In an ideal world, they need a quick pass on a Lathe, but you could try them in a pillar drill and touch them down with emery. Not the perfect answer, but it might just take enough of the roughness off them to let them go in.

Chris
 
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